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18th Edition Briefing – March 2018

18th Edition Wiring RegulationsPublication date for 18th now confirmed as 2nd July 2018

Regulations come in to effect on installations designed after 31st December 2018


18th Edition changes and additions

We now know which sections and regulations are changing in the BS7671:2018 Requirements for Electrical Installations.

Part 1 Scope, object and fundamental principles

133.1.3 will require a statement on the Electrical Installation Certificate.

Part 2 Definitions

As with every update, new and changed definitions are included

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter.

411.3.1.2 metallic pipes and point of entry

411.3.2.2 maximum disconnection times

411.3.3 limit to 32A and risk assessment relating to RCD protection

411.3.4 new regulation – RCD and luminaires

411.4.3 switiching and isolating device in PEN conductor

411.4.4 and 5 redrafts

411.6 deletions and redrafts

419 automatic disconnection not feasible

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

This chapter which was removed after the 16th Edition, reappears. This chapter will  cover the requirements for the functions of isolation, functional switching (control), auxiliary circuits, motor control, switiching off for mechanical maintenance and emergencies, which are currently in Section 537. The requires for the devices relating to these functions will remain in Section 537.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Chapter 52 – concerning wiring support systems, SELV buried cables and CPR requirements

Chapter 53 – Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminaires.

Chapter 54 – new regulations relating to earth electrodes and switching devices in a protective conductor

Chapter 55 – new scope and ground recessed luminaires

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections in particular

704 Construction sites,

708 Caravan/Camping parks,

710 Medical locations,

715 Extra low voltage lighting installations,

721 Caravans,

722 Electric Vehicle Charging,

730 Onshore Units – new section to apply to onshore installations supplying inland navigation vessels – whose power requirements are significantly greater than those of vessels covered in 709 Marinas

753 Floor and Ceiling Heating

Appendix 17 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

About Electacourse

We are the UK’s leading publisher of learning material and online courses for electricians. We have been serving the electrical industry for over ten years and in that time have helped tens of thousands of electricians achieve their qualifications.

Study where you like, when you like, in your own time and at your own pace.

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18th Edition Briefing – January 2018

The IET timeline to the publication in July 2018 of Wiring Regulations BS7671:2018 18th Edition remains on track.

We know a lot about what to expect but until the national committee JPEL/64 completes its process, nothing is confirmed.

18th Edition changes and additions

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter. Of particular note are: Regulation 411.3.1.2 which will reference identification of insulating inserts on domestic service pipes. Regulation 411.3.4 will mandate RCD protection for all new luminaires.

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

This chapter which was removed after the 16th Edition, reappears. This chapter will  cover the requirements for the functions of isolation, functional switching (control), auxiliary circuits, motor control, switiching off for mechanical maintenance and emergencies, which are currently in Section 537. The requires for the devices relating to these functions will remain in Section 537.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Complete revision of Chapter 53 to cover protection, isolation, switching, control, monitoring and overvoltage. Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminaires. In response to European practice, upgraded Regulation 542.2.3 will recommend foundation earthing systems.

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections in particular 704 Construction sites, 708 Caravan/Camping parks, 721 Caravans, 722 Electric Vehicle Charging, 753 Floor and Ceiling Heating and the new section 730 Onshore Units – this unit will apply to onshore installations supplying inland navigation vessels – whose power requirements are significantly greater than those of vessels covered in 709 Marinas

Part 8 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

About Electacourse

We are the UK’s leading publisher of learning material and online courses for electricians. We have been serving the electrical industry for over ten years and in that time have helped tens of thousands of electricians achieve their qualifications.

Study where you like, when you like, in your own time and at your own pace.

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18th Edition Wiring Regulations – public comments now open

18th Edition Wiring Regulations

The British Standards Institute have now made the draft of the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations, BS 7671 available for public comments.  Have your say in the new regulations.

Visit the BSI webpage for the 18th Edition, sign up with your email address, access the document and make comments. You have until 23rd August before the public consultation is closed.

When will the 18th Edition be published?

The planned publication date is 1st July 2018 and the implementation date for new installations to confirm to BS7671 18th Edition will be January 2019.

Electacourse have a number of offers to help our 17th Edition customers who are thinking whether to do the 17th Edition Course now or wait for the 18th Edition. See the chart below.

What changes are likely?

We reported before on possible changes, the draft publication now has details of the proposed changes. The colour of the 18th Edition looks like it is going to be Sky Blue, not the dark blue as we guessed before. Significant changes are:

Definitions

With every new edition or update of the Regulations, the definitions are updated and modified

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter relating to disconnection times, circuit types, equipotential bonding, RCD protection, IT systems and automatic disconnection

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

New chapter to deal with non-automatic isolation and switching measures.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Complete revision of Chapter 53 to cover protection, isolation, switching, control, monitoring and overvoltage. Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminairs.

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections

Part 8 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

What can you expect from Electacourse?

Electacourse are already a leading provider of courses for electricians and students aiming to achieve their 17th Edition qualification. Together with other industry leaders, Electacourse will participate in the public consultation for the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations and will have courses and student material available as soon as the details of the 18th Edition are finalised.

For electrical contractors you will be able sign up to the Electacourse 18th Edition Online Course once it becomes available. If you would like us to keep you informed, use the contact form below.

For training companies and FE Colleges, we will be able to offer you a ‘white label’ 18th Edition Online Course. That is, you can sign up with Electacourse for a license to use our 18th Edition material to train your students. The material will be available to your students under your own branding. Use the contact form below and we will keep you up-to-date.

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Exam Technique for electricians

If you have read our previous post on preparing for an exam then you will know that a lot of work goes in to making sure that you are ready for your big exam. So with so much effort under your belt, it would seem silly to fall at the final hurdle.

Let us show you some of the key exam day techniques to help you to get even closer to your goals.

Getting Ready

After a good night’s sleep you should be up and ready to head to your local exam centre. You will want to leave home with plenty of time and ensure that you have planned your route out.

You will not be allowed in to the exam if you are late and if you get there just in time then you are more likely to feel flustered and stressed as you enter the room.

You should also make sure you have all the right equipment with you in order to complete the exam and always, always take a spare pen or two.

Give yourself up a timetable

When the time comes to opening those papers there is a good chance you are going to feel some panic about what you may find. Just keep calm and work out in your head a timetable of how long to give each question (although this may already be set out for you).

You should try to plan in 10 minutes at the end of the test for proof-reading.

Reading through the questions

Make sure that you read each and every question accurately, take the time to make sure you understand each point as candidates are more likely to lose marks simply because they haven’t read the questions properly. Read each one twice, three times if you have to.

Underline or mark anything that you feel is important in the question and ensure that you can see what is meant by each phrase or point.

Keep Calm

There is a good chance that at some point in the exam you are going to draw a blank. When this happens, just take a deep breath, compose yourself and think back to all that revision, it will soon come back to you.

Remember, exams are supposed to test you, otherwise they wouldn’t be exams, so don’t worry if you have to really think about the answer.

If you are really struggling, then try answering all the questions that you are sure of. This will not only give your brain a rest but also boost your confidence as it shows you everything you do know.

Answering the questions

Always make it clear which question you are answering, you should also use correct and up to date terminology, after all this is professional exam. The examiner who marks your answers will not assume anything, so make sure you make every point you know clearly.

Also, don’t forget to use your best handwriting, if the examiner cannot understand what you have written then they won’t be able to mark it for you.

Plan each answer before you put it on the paper and make sure that you are understanding what is being asked of you.

Check and check again

As we have already said, try to leave yourself around 10 minutes towards the end of the exam to check over your work.

During this time, you should:

  • Make sure you have answered all the questions
  • Ensure that you have answered questions as precisely and thoroughly as you can
  • Make sure that you have outlined your workings out if it is a maths questions
  • Check that you have used all the relevant terminology

Once you have done all this you should have a completed test in front of you. Try to relax and not worry about what you have written. Now is the time just to wait for your results and see whether or not you have qualified.

 

 

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How to prepare for your City & Guilds electrical qualification exams

Exams are a nerve wracking time for anyone; not least of all for those who are relying on passing to help their career. This is particularly true for electricians who will need to ensure they have the relevant qualifications in order to provide customers with a service.

Here at Electacourse we have put together some top tips for exam preparation, meaning that no matter how important the exam is, you will find ready to face it.

Reduce your stress

It is normal to feel stressed as a big exam loom on the horizon. This can come in both physical and mental forms and whilst stress is normal, you should try to reduce how much it affects you.

Physical stress can be reduced in the lead up to an exam by making sure that you keep up a positive fitness and eating plan. Not only this, but in the week or so before the exam it is important to make sure that you get enough sleep, otherwise you may underperform due to tiredness when it really matters.

Mental stress can be a little trickier to combat. Fear is a huge part of stressful feelings, especially fear of what questions you may face and whether you will be able to answer them. One of the best ways you can combat these feelings is by sourcing question and answer practice books and guidance notes. These are designed to give you a feel for the types of questions you can expect and give you the confidence to face them on the day.

Never over-study

The temptation may be to cram as much information as you can into your head before an exam; however over-studying can be a dangerous game. Instead of filling your brain up with useful information, over-studying can lead to tiredness and stress.

Instead you should balance your studying with plenty of breaks, if you are struggling to understand something, once you leave it for 10 minutes you might find it becomes all the clearer in your mind.

Set a revision schedule

Preparation is key in so many aspects of life, especially exams. Make sure you draw yourself a revision schedule in the fortnight before your exam. Set out all the topics that you need to cover and slot them into realistic time scales. This means that you won’t be at risk of over-studying and that you can give yourself plenty of time to learn each different topic.

Don’t forget to plan in for your “normal life” too. There is a good chance that you will still have a job, family or other commitments and if this is the case then you should still make plenty of time for them too.

Pick the right study method

Everyone learns in different ways. Reading might be best for some, whilst others need to listen to the words in order to take them in. Identify the best way that you learn and stick to it. After all, there is no-one else sitting the exam in your place, so you might as well personalise it as much as you can.

So there you have it, some of the ways that you can be ready for your exam. Take a deep breath and remember that if you stay calm and believe in yourself and what you have studied, you will be surprised by what you can achieve.

Coming soon tips on how to make a success of the exam once you are at the exam centre.