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How to become an electrician in the UK

The electrical industry in the UK has recognised formal qualifications that provide a clear qualification route for an electrician whether or not they are a new entrant, already experienced or have overseas qualifications.

Introduction

Electacourse strongly recommend you contact electrotechnical industry bodies and organisations to confirm the qualifications required for becoming an electrician in the UK (link below) for the work which you plan to undertake, but the Electacourse summary understanding of the process of becoming qualified to work as an electrician in the UK is:

All people who are working unsupervised as a fully qualified electrician in the electrotechnical sector need to be qualified to the level of the industry-recognised NVQ level 3 qualifications. How you get to this level is dependent on your status.

For people who want to work only on domestic electrical installations, there is a lower threshold alternative of becoming registered on a self-certification scheme (run by Elecsa, Benchmark and others) who may be able to undertake and self-certify their work on domestic installations. See below the information about Part P and qualifying as a domestic installer.

Fully Qualified Electrician

To become a fully qualified electrician able to do industrial, commercial and not just domestic work, the following are the routes to qualification:

  1. For all new entrants to become recognised as an electrician, the Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Installing Electrotechnical systems and equipment (building structures and the environment) is required. This diploma can be obtained by undertaking study either with or without employer sponsorship at Further Education colleges or private training providers. By the nature of the practical requirement of some parts of electrical training, it is not possible to undertake all elements of this qualification by self-study alone.
  2. For individuals who have some previous experience whether in the UK or elsewhere, they need an interview with an assessor to develop an individual assessment plan without necessarily the need to go back to college to train in the classroom, (see AM2 on electricalqualifications.com).The AM2 assessment is administered by NET (http://netservices.org.uk/). We recommend that even if you have no electrical installation employment experience but have completed a college course, you seek advice from NET on final qualification requirements. AM2 is normally part of NVQ Diplomas.
  3. If you are already qualified in another country, then for some countries there are special arrangements where equivalence between electrical qualifications has been established, the following website has more information – http://summitskillsframework.naric.org.uk/index.asp?file=introduction

Domestic Electrical Installer

Domestic Installer Part P Courses available from some providers are designed to prepare candidates for the self-certification scheme Part P Assessment. On successful completion of a Part P Assessment, electricians are qualified to self-certify their own electrical work on domestic installations.

Electacourse Courses

Electacourse publish the 17th Edition Course provides everything required to achieve the 17th Edition Wiring Regulations qualification as assessed by the City & Guilds 2382-15 examination. This is an essential qualification for all UK electricians. It is also a general requirement (but not necessarily obligatory) for Domestic Installers. Optionally this course includes the City & Guilds 2382-15 17th Edition exam, we have partner examination centres throughout the UK.

Most of the other material which we publish at Electacourse is designed as preparation and revision material for the various City and Guilds examinations and are used by people who are taking these exams as part of their route to qualification and professional improvement as electricians.

We have courses and exam practice simulators which cover

On our website you will find links to our courses and to trade bodies and organisations which can provide complete information about becoming an electrician in the UK.  You may also find the information on http://www.electricalqualifications.com useful.  On this site you will also find information about transferring your home country qualifications to UK qualifications.

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Electacourse 18th Edition Online Course now CPD accredited

Electacourse are proud to announce that our best-selling 18th Edition Online Course has now been accredited by the CPD Certification Service.

The CPD Certification Service is the independent CPD accreditation centre working across all sectors, disciplines and further learning applications. The CPD Service’s recognised and authoritative CPD Member and CPD Certified symbols provide assurance the material concerned achieves the qualitative standards required by students, companies and employers.

Electacourse have always been confident our Online Wiring Regulations course is of the highest quality. Our thousands of successful customers frequently tell us how useful our material has been to them. Now, future customers and clients can be confident that with the Electacourse 18th Edition Online Course, you will be studying an independently certified course.

Why study your 18th Edition with us?

  • Success – Join the 1000’s of students who successfully passed their 17th Edition with us
  • Effective – We focus on exam success with a database of over 1,000 questions designed to give you maximum exam practice
  • Engaging – We are publishers and technologists and have been involved in online learning for over twenty years
  • Great value – We keep our prices competitive
  • Flexibility – You do not need you to commit to do the exam with us. We give you the option of where to book your exam – or have us book it for you
  • Accessibility – Our 18th Edition Course is online – study when you want, where you and on whatever device. We were the first company to put the Wiring Regulations course online. We know how to make the material work for students

Bulk purchase for companies and employers – tell us your requirements

Individual purchase

The only 18th Edition Online Course structured how students want.

Tons of practice questions. Reference to key regulations.

Exclusive tips for exam success.

Now integrated with Amazon Alexa voice technology, so just sit back and listen.

Read more | Add to cart – £140

Course completion

Choose to take the City & Guilds 2382-18 exam with us (discounted price for Electacourse students). Receive CPD and Completion Certificates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18th Edition South Coast Special

Recently at Electacourse we were approached by an enterprising group of Bournemouth electricians who wanted to get 18th Edition qualified but also wanted the convenience of taking the exam locally.

In partnership with JLS Electrical Training, Electacourse have the perfect solution for this requirement.  We enrolled six electricians onto the 18th Edition Online Course. And after a period of study online with Electacourse including use of the 2382-18 Online Practice tests, the six electricians were ready to take the City & Guilds 2382-18 exam.

We booked a large meeting room at a convenient local hotel, JLS Training set up the exam room and invigilated the candidates as they sat the 2382-18 exam.

All six candidates passed with an average mark of over 80% with one candidate just missing 60 out of 60 by one question!

Feedback from the electricians was excellent:

The online course was well structured and informative. The exams at the end of the chapters were very helpful.

I would not hesitate recommending Electacourse for online training. Fitting in time to study around work was really helpful. Far better than tying up time at college.
Craig B

Feedback wise from speaking to the guys during the course everything was positive, the online course was good and the ‘motivational’ emails from yourself gave us a kick to get on with it! Overall the online course was well structured and easy to work through and it did what is was supposed to because we all passed so I think the results speak for themselves.

Overall a great experience and we will be recommending it to everyone.
Phil M

Electacourse and JLS Training can deliver a custom 18th Edition exam experience for any group of electricians or a company, at a location of your choice anywhere in the UK. Generally, the minimum number required to make it work at a very competitive price is 6 candidates. Contact us for more information – contact@electacourse.com, or use the form on our website at Electacourse.com.

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18th Edition Briefing – March 2018

18th Edition Wiring RegulationsPublication date for 18th now confirmed as 2nd July 2018

Regulations come in to effect on installations designed after 31st December 2018


18th Edition changes and additions

We now know which sections and regulations are changing in the BS7671:2018 Requirements for Electrical Installations.

Part 1 Scope, object and fundamental principles

133.1.3 will require a statement on the Electrical Installation Certificate.

Part 2 Definitions

As with every update, new and changed definitions are included

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter.

411.3.1.2 metallic pipes and point of entry

411.3.2.2 maximum disconnection times

411.3.3 limit to 32A and risk assessment relating to RCD protection

411.3.4 new regulation – RCD and luminaires

411.4.3 switiching and isolating device in PEN conductor

411.4.4 and 5 redrafts

411.6 deletions and redrafts

419 automatic disconnection not feasible

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

This chapter which was removed after the 16th Edition, reappears. This chapter will  cover the requirements for the functions of isolation, functional switching (control), auxiliary circuits, motor control, switiching off for mechanical maintenance and emergencies, which are currently in Section 537. The requires for the devices relating to these functions will remain in Section 537.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Chapter 52 – concerning wiring support systems, SELV buried cables and CPR requirements

Chapter 53 – Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminaires.

Chapter 54 – new regulations relating to earth electrodes and switching devices in a protective conductor

Chapter 55 – new scope and ground recessed luminaires

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections in particular

704 Construction sites,

708 Caravan/Camping parks,

710 Medical locations,

715 Extra low voltage lighting installations,

721 Caravans,

722 Electric Vehicle Charging,

730 Onshore Units – new section to apply to onshore installations supplying inland navigation vessels – whose power requirements are significantly greater than those of vessels covered in 709 Marinas

753 Floor and Ceiling Heating

Appendix 17 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

About Electacourse

We are the UK’s leading publisher of learning material and online courses for electricians. We have been serving the electrical industry for over ten years and in that time have helped tens of thousands of electricians achieve their qualifications.

Study where you like, when you like, in your own time and at your own pace.

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18th Edition Briefing – January 2018

The IET timeline to the publication in July 2018 of Wiring Regulations BS7671:2018 18th Edition remains on track.

We know a lot about what to expect but until the national committee JPEL/64 completes its process, nothing is confirmed.

18th Edition changes and additions

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter. Of particular note are: Regulation 411.3.1.2 which will reference identification of insulating inserts on domestic service pipes. Regulation 411.3.4 will mandate RCD protection for all new luminaires.

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

This chapter which was removed after the 16th Edition, reappears. This chapter will  cover the requirements for the functions of isolation, functional switching (control), auxiliary circuits, motor control, switiching off for mechanical maintenance and emergencies, which are currently in Section 537. The requires for the devices relating to these functions will remain in Section 537.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Complete revision of Chapter 53 to cover protection, isolation, switching, control, monitoring and overvoltage. Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminaires. In response to European practice, upgraded Regulation 542.2.3 will recommend foundation earthing systems.

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections in particular 704 Construction sites, 708 Caravan/Camping parks, 721 Caravans, 722 Electric Vehicle Charging, 753 Floor and Ceiling Heating and the new section 730 Onshore Units – this unit will apply to onshore installations supplying inland navigation vessels – whose power requirements are significantly greater than those of vessels covered in 709 Marinas

Part 8 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

About Electacourse

We are the UK’s leading publisher of learning material and online courses for electricians. We have been serving the electrical industry for over ten years and in that time have helped tens of thousands of electricians achieve their qualifications.

Study where you like, when you like, in your own time and at your own pace.

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Maths for electricians

Maths for electricians is easy

Maths does not need to be difficult.

All through school, college and in fact, all through life, we are told that maths is difficult and that you need a brain the size of a planet to understand maths. But it is not true.

Sure, if you want to compute how to send people to Mars and back or you want to fire a missile from a submarine and pop it on some Asian dictator’s head, you have got to do some brain-busting maths, but here in the UK, doing industrial, commercial and domestic electrical installations, it is not that tough.

Maths for electricians online courseAt Electacourse we have given this a lot of thought and have written a course Maths for Electricians which we think hits the spot. We are not concerned whether you have a left-sided or a right-sided brain and whether one side or another is better for maths. We focus on the place and time you need to know maths most: when you are taking an exam or an assessment.

Of course, you need maths when you are on a job, but mostly in those circumstances, you are using some pretty good instruments which are doing the calculations for you, or you have bought some excellent apps and programs: punch the numbers in and the correct answers come out.

For nearly every qualification you need as an electrician, you can take into the exam the relevant reference books and a calculator. Books such as [amazon_textlink asin=’184919873X’ text=’IET Guidance Note 3′ template=’ProductLink’ store=’electacourse-21′ marketplace=’UK’ link_id=’c6d95ad5-d06f-11e7-99db-17fc77f40498′] or [amazon_textlink asin=’184919887X’ text=’IET On Site Guide’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’electacourse-21′ marketplace=’UK’ link_id=’253eda5a-d070-11e7-b5d9-ff2b52b5a835′] mostly have the equations you need to pass that exam.

So, our Maths for Electricians course does not spend ages trying to get you to understand the whole range of stuff which is mathematics, we concentrate on just three things:

  1. Maths basics – types of numbers and how to work with them – for instance: plus, minus, multiply, divide, % etc
  2. Units – Metres, Amps, Volts, Watts etc and their sizes – for instance millimetres, kilowatts etc
  3. Equations – this where it all comes together. First we talk about how to change equations, ie from Ohm’s Law you get both A = V/R (Current = Volts divided by Resistance) and R = V/A. Then we talk about how to put numbers and units into the equations to get the answers you need.

Bish, Bosh. Done.

But, here we have to add some stuff which isn’t small print and it is important. This Maths for Electricians course is good for you if you are:

  1. studying for City & Guilds exams such as 2382-15, 2394/95, 2365, 2357 and 2391-50, 51 and 52. In this course you should find all the maths and equations you need for those exams. And all have them have tons of practice questions.
  2. an electrician who wants to brush up on their maths and remind yourself you can still do it.
  3. you are in another trade but have to understand or undertake some electrical work

For those of you who are working in high voltage, electrical installation design or other specialist and advanced areas of electrical work, this course would be considered an introduction. It does not cover the complex and advanced maths which you need and use in your everyday work.

 

 

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2391 Inspection and Testing is back!

But what about 2394/2395?

Do not be alarmed if you already have the 2394/2395 qualifications or if you are still studying for them. These qualifications continue alongside the new 2391 and will be taught and examined up to August 2018; and of course the 2394 and 2395 qualifications will continue to be recognised by industry and employers.

The 2394 and 2395 qualifications have acquired a deserved reputation as high quality evidence of advanced electrical verification, inspection and testing skills. That said, many will agree that the examination method for 2394 and 2395 has not been easy or efficient – quarterly written exams with hard-to-schedule resits is costly and time-consuming for examination centres and for candidates. We don’t know if this is the reason behind the change, but we are sure it must have been taken into account by City & Guilds when taking the decision to introduce the new 2391 qualification.

The new 2391 qualifications

The new inspection and testing qualifications are to be known as 2391-50, 2391-51 and 2391-52. Each qualification will be assessed by a multiple choice eVolve exam and an assignment including a practical assessment and a short written paper exam.

The qualifications are active from now, June 2017; training centres and FE colleges will soon have them available for study. Electacourse are have commissioning expert tutors to write material for 2391-50, 2391-51 and 2391-52. We have a range of material for:

  • Electricians and other candidates planning to take the qualification, or
  • Training centres and colleges who require classroom and teaching material 

Full range of material here.

2391-50 Level 3 Award in Initial Verification

This qualification is aimed at domestic installers. Currently domestic installers have no formal requirement for initial verification. This award addresses this omission in skills and qualification. Assessed by a 40 question multiple choice test and two practical assignments involving verification skills on a test rig and a short written paper exam.

2391-51 Level 3 Award in Periodic Inspection & Testing

This award is designed for completing apprentices and engineers who need only periodic assessment. For apprentices and engineers who have completed the 2357 apprenticeship and will have been assessed on Initial Verification, it is not required for them to be assessed again. Assessed by a 40 question multiple choice test and three practical assignments involving visual photo exercise, inspection skills on a test rig and a short written paper exam.

2391-52 Level 3 Award in Inspection & Testing

This qualification is for practising electricians who want both disciplines – periodic and initial. Assessed by a 60 question multiple choice test and three practical assignments involving visual photo exercise, inspection skills on a test rig and a short written paper exam.

The 2391-52 is a combination of both 2391-50 and 2391-51. You do not need to do all three qualifications. Most people seem to be planning on doing the combined 2391-52.

Full range of 2391 training and support material >

 

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18th Edition Wiring Regulations – public comments now open

18th Edition Wiring Regulations

The British Standards Institute have now made the draft of the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations, BS 7671 available for public comments.  Have your say in the new regulations.

Visit the BSI webpage for the 18th Edition, sign up with your email address, access the document and make comments. You have until 23rd August before the public consultation is closed.

When will the 18th Edition be published?

The planned publication date is 1st July 2018 and the implementation date for new installations to confirm to BS7671 18th Edition will be January 2019.

Electacourse have a number of offers to help our 17th Edition customers who are thinking whether to do the 17th Edition Course now or wait for the 18th Edition. See the chart below.

What changes are likely?

We reported before on possible changes, the draft publication now has details of the proposed changes. The colour of the 18th Edition looks like it is going to be Sky Blue, not the dark blue as we guessed before. Significant changes are:

Definitions

With every new edition or update of the Regulations, the definitions are updated and modified

Chapter 41 – Protection against electric shock

Significant changes are proposed throughout this chapter relating to disconnection times, circuit types, equipotential bonding, RCD protection, IT systems and automatic disconnection

Chapter 42 – Protection against thermal effects

Installation of arc fault detection devices to mitigate risk of fire

Chapter 44 – Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Changes to specific sections and critically a requirement for risk assessment to be performed in order to determine if protection against transient overvoltage is required.

Chapter 46 – Devices for isolation and switching

New chapter to deal with non-automatic isolation and switching measures.

Part 5 – Selection and Erection of Equipment

Complete revision of Chapter 53 to cover protection, isolation, switching, control, monitoring and overvoltage. Changes to protection against overvoltage, earthing arrangements, protective conductors and other equipment including ground-recessed luminairs.

Part 6 – Inspection and testing

Completely restructured to align with CENELEC standards

Part 7 – Special installations or locations

A large number of small changes in many sections

Part 8 – Energy Efficiency

A major new addition to the Wiring Regulations to support the worldwide requirement to reduce the consumption of energy and how electrical installations can contribute to this effort, effectively and safely.

What can you expect from Electacourse?

Electacourse are already a leading provider of courses for electricians and students aiming to achieve their 17th Edition qualification. Together with other industry leaders, Electacourse will participate in the public consultation for the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations and will have courses and student material available as soon as the details of the 18th Edition are finalised.

For electrical contractors you will be able sign up to the Electacourse 18th Edition Online Course once it becomes available. If you would like us to keep you informed, use the contact form below.

For training companies and FE Colleges, we will be able to offer you a ‘white label’ 18th Edition Online Course. That is, you can sign up with Electacourse for a license to use our 18th Edition material to train your students. The material will be available to your students under your own branding. Use the contact form below and we will keep you up-to-date.

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2394 and 2395 June 2017 exams – be prepared

Pass rates for 2394 and 2395 have picked up since the very poor results of December 2016. For the last set of exams for which the examiners have provided data is February 2017, the pass rate for 2394 is up to 68% well above the historical average. The pass rate for 2395 is 76%, the second highest ever.

For all of you who are taking your inspection and testing exams next week these results should give you confidence that the trend is in the right direction.

Reviewing the examiner’s report, we continue to see the comment: ‘A large number of candidates failed to read the questions and scenario carefully’ . This is Exam Technique 101. Unless you read the question correctly, it is not possible to answer it correctly. 

Again, and again, Electacourse see the examiners reporting that candidates repeatedly making the same errors. In the Electacourse products 2394 and 2395 Written Exam Guidance Notes, we go into detail about how to pass these exams and in another post we will highlight the most common errors seen by the examiners. In the meantime, by far the most common errors seen by examiners are:

2394 Common Errors

  1. Candidates use the term ‘live’ rather than ‘line and interchange the terms when describing test procedures
  2. Inability to list the three documents that must be completed and handed to the client on completion of an initial verification of an installation
  3. Candidates are only reading part of the question – this is simple to resolve with good exam technique (covered in our previous post)

2395 Common Errors

  1. Candidates need to be aware of the requirement to show calculations and descriptions to demonstrate their conclusions when answering questions
  2. Candidates are not sufficiently familiar with the items they are to consider, inspect and record. Familiarity will greatly improve both candidates understanding of the inspection process and their success in any related questions
  3. Candidates repeatedly seem to forget that 2395 is an examination of periodic inspection and not initial verification

Falling Candidate numbers

Our last report on candidate numbers suggested the continuing decline of candidates for the 2394 and 2395 may be related to Brexit. This may be true, we can all see the difficulties firms are having in recruiting electricians and the European route is quite slow now, but talking with our contacts, it looks like there may be a different reason.

There seems to be a lack of confidence in the 2394 and 2395 qualifications. We hear chatter that employers continue to not completely understand the qualification. We know this is nonsense. The 2394 and 2395 are high quality Level 3 qualifications which enable electricians to demonstrate their skills in initial verification, inspection and testing. But could the chatter be putting off candidates?

Electacourse have the largest range of revision material for Inspection and Testing, if you need to do some last minute revision, visit the Electacourse Inspection and Testing Catalogue

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How to become a PAT Tester

What is PAT Testing?

Portable Appliance Testing is a valuable skill for electricians and others involved in ensuring electrical equipment is maintained in a safe condition. Becoming a PAT Tester offers electricians, facilities managers and everyone looking for a new  business opportunity to take advantage of the PAT Testing requirements.

New Electacourse Online PAT Testing Course

From just £40, study the Electacourse Online PAT Testing Course to gain the skills and knowledge to enable you to understand the requirements of being a PAT Tester.

PAT Testing Introduction

According to The Health & Safety Executive, around 25% of all reportable electrical accidents involve portable appliances. The Electricity at Work Regulations place a legal responsibility on employers, employees and self-employed persons to comply with the provisions of the Electricity at Work regulations and take all reasonable steps to ensure that no danger arises from the use of such equipment. Thus, in effect, a systematic and regular program of maintenance, inspection and testing is required. The Health & Safety at Work Act (1974) places this obligation in the following circumstances:

  • Where portable appliances are used by employees.
  • Where the public may use portable appliances in establishments such as schools, hospitals, shops and hotels etc.
  • Where appliances are repaired or serviced.
  • Where appliances are supplied or hired.

The level of inspection and testing requirement depends upon the level of risk of the portable appliance becoming faulty, which is in turn dependant upon the type of portable appliance, the nature of its use and the environment in which the appliance is used.

The publication the Code of Practice for In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment published by The Institution of Electrical Engineers (the IEE) is a guide that forms the basis for portable appliance testing (PAT) in the U.K.

Legal Requirements

The legislation that is relevant to portable appliance testing include the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974, the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989, the Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999, the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 and the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998.

The Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 puts the duty of care upon both the employee and the employer to ensure the safety of all persons on the work premises. This also applies to the self employed.

Specifically, the ‘Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998’ states that:

“Every employer shall ensure that work equipment is maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair.”

This is just one example of one piece of legislation relevant to PAT testing and it is clear that there is a legal requirement to inspect and test all types of electrical equipment in all work situations.

What next?

This page has given you a brief introduction to PAT Testing. You do not need to be a qualified electrician to be a PAT Tester, but it does form part of many electricians work portfolio. To become a PAT Tester you have a number of possibilities:

  1. Take a PAT Testing Course with a commercial or FE College training provider. They can offer the full package (course plus 2377-22) in one go – but often at a high price
  2. Study on your own with the great value  Electacourse Online PAT Testing Course –  from only £40, together with the IET Code of Practice. This option is recommended if you already have some electrical experience and you have the opportunity to improve your practice skills. If you like, you can follow this up with the City & Guilds 2377-22 exam which you can find offered in many locations
  3. Remember you will need to purchase PAT Testing equipment. Some equipment companies offer a ‘PAT Testing Business in a Box’ – these include all you need to start up a PAT Testing business.
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Dramatic fall in 2395 exam results

  1. The December 2016 series has seen a significant drop in the performance of candidates for the 2395 exam
  2. The number of candidates has fallen throughout 2016

From a rising trend, the December series for 2395 showed a drop in numbers of candidates passing the exam to just 35%. Back to the bad old days when the 2395 was first introduced in 2012.

The examiners have not identified a single reason for this result, but they do point out that ‘A large number of candidates failed to read the questions and scenario carefully [Electacourse – we keep reminding our customers of this]. One example being where candidates incorrectly listed x0.5, x1 and x5 as the applied test currents for RCBO testing, when the question clearly stated applied test current in mA, so needed the actual mA values.’

From August 2014, the pass rate has generally been above 50% for both 2394 and 2395 and is stabilising around 60% pass rate for 2394 and 55% pass rate for 2395.

Again, and again, Electacourse see the examiners reporting that candidates repeatedly making the same errors. In the Electacourse products 2394 and 2395 Written Exam Guidance Notes, we go into detail about how to pass these exams and in another post we will highlight the most common errors seen by the examiners. In the meantime, by far the most common errors seen by examiners are:

2394 Common Errors

  1. Candidates use the term ‘live’ rather than ‘line and interchange the terms when describing test procedures
  2. Inability to list the three documents that must be completed and handed to the client on completion of an initial verification of an installation
  3. Candidates are only reading part of the question – this is simple to resolve with good exam technique (covered in our previous post)

2395 Common Errors

  1. Candidates need to be aware of the requirement to show calculations and descriptions to demonstrate their conclusions when answering questions
  2. Candidates are not sufficiently familiar with the items they are to consider, inspect and record. Familiarity will greatly improve both candidates understanding of the inspection process and their success in any related questions
  3. Candidates repeatedly seem to forget that 2395 is an examination of periodic inspection and not initial verification

Falling Candidate numbers

Could this be the Brexit effect? As I think all of us in involved in the construction industry have noticed, the numbers of new entrants coming to work in the industry from Europe has gone down.

The Electacourse customer data does not fully support a drop of 50% in new staff coming into the electrical trade, but as we have Tweeted (@Electacourse) and reported previously, we can certainly see a Brexit impact.

This is bad news and good news

Bad news that a limit on the number of people coming in to the industry limits company growth and opportunity. Good news for individual sparkies already qualified: you will be able to increase your rates and choose your jobs.

For the rest of us, our home rewires will cost more.

View Electacourse Inspection and Testing Catalogue